• Keep fallen fruit under trees picked up and disposed of to help reduce insect and disease problems next year. If infestations were severe, raking up fallen leaves as soon as they drop will also help prevent insects and disease.
  • For garden areas not being used for winter crops, plant a cover crop in September or October to help control weeds and improve soil. Cover crops (sometimes referred to as green manure) usually contain a mixture of seeds that will produce plants which work in different ways. Vetch, clover and fava beans are legumes that extract nitrogen from the air and store it in root nodules. Annual or cereal rye grass develop long tap roots and are good for breaking up the soil at a greater depth.
  • Begin curing onions and garlic. As tops begin to yellow, push tops over. This will force the bulbs into their final maturing stage. About three weeks after bending the tops, dig up the onions or garlic. Spread them out to dry for about 10 days in a shaded place protected from dew or rain. Trim the roots and tops off and store where they will have plenty of air circulation that will prevent rotting. Elephant Garlic can be left in the ground over winter and will grow even larger next year.
  • If potato vines have died down, dig up a few tubers. Rub the potato skin to see if they have hardened. If the skin comes off easily wait a week or two before harvesting. Store potatoes in a cool, even temperature, dark and fairly humid place. Donโ€™t let the potatoes touch one another, put sawdust or wood shavings between them. Ideal storage temperature is 40 degrees with about 90% humidity.
  • Put out bird feeders and bird houses now so birds will get used to them by the time winter weather sets in.
  • Fall vegetables can be planted now. Cabbage, kale, lettuce, cauliflower, parsley, onions, garlic and carrots are all good choices.